Horology is the science of time, timekeeping, and timekeepers. Knowing how to wind and set your watch is important for anyone interested in this science.

A timepiece can be a big investment, so it is imperative that you know how to keep them in top condition. It’s always a good time for a primer on setting and winding a watch—whether the timepiece is powered by a battery, requires near-daily winding, or winds itself when worn on the wrist.

Check out this informative video from David Lee, the Vice President of Certified Pre-Owned at Tourneau, as he offers an easy-to-understand guide to the fundamentals of horology: How To Wind and Set Your Watch

We hope this helps you understand how to keep your timepiece in great working condition!

Though many fine timepieces are built to last more than a lifetime, watches are subject to everyday stresses like dings, magnetization, and contact with rain or perspiration.

A general rule of thumb? Visit your local repair shop for a quick look  every year or two—as well as a full service approximately every five years.

Here are a few reliable indicators that it’s a good idea to have an expert take a look at your prized timepiece:

1. Moisture in the case

2. The second hand skips several seconds

3. You hear a rattle inside the case, or the hands on the dial seem ‘loose.’

4. The watch is fast or slow (4-6 seconds) throughout the day

If your timepieces are experiencing any of these indicators, get it checked out immediately!

New from Rolex, the Deepsea D-Blue Dial is perfect for the water lover! It is waterproof to the extreme depth of 3,900 metres!

It has a 44 mm Oyster case that is reinforced with the patented Ringlock System, which was designed to withstand water pressure equivalent to the weight of 3-tons on the crystal. The Oyster case and monobloc case middle are made in 904L stainless steel and the solid case back is made in G5 titanium. It is very practical and wearable. 

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As a tribute to the partnership between Rolex and filmmaker-explorer James Cameron, the “DEEPSEA” marking on the D-blue dial is the same green colour as Cameron’s submersible as perceived underwater. 

The timepiece is fitted with a 904L stainless steel Oyster bracelet with flat three-piece solid links, an Oysterlock safety clasp and the patented Glidelock and Fliplock diving extension systems. 

It is a remarkable watch!

Let’s face it, jewelry is expensive. So when you are traveling, you need to make sure that you are taking care of it! Here are some helpful tips for when traveling with jewelry!

-Photograph your jewelry: if a piece is lost and later find, this will let you be able to identify it!

-Carry your jewelry with you: pack your jewelry in your carry-on because checked bags can easily get lost!


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-Pack your jewelry in plastic bags: put each piece in its own bag and label the bag with a description of what’s inside it. This lets you quickly see everything that you’ve brought. REMEMBER, do not store pearls in plastic bags for extended periods of time.

-String chains through straws: this prevents the chains getting tangled and can save you a headache later on!

Remember these hints for the next time you travel!

Sometimes, less is more. That  seems to be the current trend in the higher echelons of horology.

Despite the world being enthralled by technological advances, the finest watchmakers stick to relatively simple designs. They believe that their costumers are not looking to be flashy. The US President of Patek Philippe, Larry Pettinelli, says “Our customers aren’t usually trying to show the world that they’ve made it, most people don’t recognize our watches from 10 feet away unless they’re collectors.”

Here are some examples of Patek Philippe’s latest timepieces:

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These pieces are beautiful and amazingly built– everything you have come to expect from Patek. They are not over the top  and people enjoy that. Even complicated-watch fans are starting to acknowledge the absurdity of certain gizmos.

It seems that simple is the new way to go.